Beaumont to support school mission with fair trade uniform skirts

In alignment with our mission of educating women for life, leadership and service, Beaumont School has partnered with One Seed Heritage to offer uniform skirts to their students that are made by fair trade workers and ethically sourced.

Beginning during the 2015-2016 school year, Beaumont students will have the option to purchase uniform skirts that were handmade by women of the Mayan community of San Juan La Laguna in Guatemala. These women are paid fairly and create the skirts with organic cotton grown on family farms and dye created with plants. Five percent of purchases will fund scholarships for Guatemalan children, whose literacy and school enrollment rates are some of the lowest in the world.

“Our women-owned cooperatives are inspired by the Beaumont community's commitment to fair trade and social justice,” said Hilary Dell, founder of One Seed Heritage. “This is just the beginning of our journey to strengthen woman-owned businesses and introduce the next generation of women leaders to global entrepreneurship.”

Beaumont began exploring the option of fair trade skirts with One Seed Heritage during the 2014-2015 school year, with two students testing out prototypes for several months. The skirts will be offered at a competitive price as Schoolbelle's, which families will still be able to order from.

A partnership with One Seed Heritage enforces the Beaumont’s mission through educating students about the importance of creating social and economic mobility within communities of need, inspiring human empowerment; and creating sustainable, quality, organic products.

Click here to view products and order from One Seed Heritage. 


One Seed Heritage founder, Hilary Dell, with students that tested uniform prototypes during the 2014-2015 school year


Lupe, head seamstress at the sewing cooperative in Guatemala, holds up a finished version of Beaumont's fair trade skirt


A Beaumont skirt being sewn. These skirts are made from local, organic cotton and are dyed naturally with plants